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Flow Chemistry Short Course

June 8, 2011 - June 10, 2011

Title: Flow Chemistry: Continuous Synthesis and Purification of Pharmaceuticals
Date: June 8-10, 2011
Location: MIT Campus – Cambridge, MA
URL: http://web.mit.edu/professional/short-programs/courses/flow_chemistry.html

COURSE SUMMARY
For approximately two centuries, organic synthesis has generally been conducted in a batch mode (flasks, vessels). Currently, in contrast to nearly all other major manufacturing industries, pharmaceutical companies utilize batch approaches for synthesis, with few exceptions. As economic and environmental pressures have increased, so has interest in continuous processes and continuous manufacturing. Chemistry in flow provides exquisite control over reaction conditions, incorporates continuous separations and in-line recycling of reagents, and because reactor volumes are small compared to batch, significantly enhances safety. Scale-up to large production is achieved not with stepwise transitions to larger and larger vessels, but by knowledge based selection of the appropriate size, running multiple systems in parallel, and adjusting the time a system is in operation. Moreover, a much broader range of reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, and reaction time) and many classes of reactions that are impossible, hazardous, low-throughput, or capricious in batch are safely and conveniently achieved in flow.
This course will focus on the fundamental principles and technologies used in the continuous synthesis and purification of small molecules. The advantages and challenges of flow or continuous manufacturing in comparison to batch for the production of small molecules will be discussed extensively. Advanced topics will include automation, scale-up strategies, cutting-edge methods of synthesis, and purification. Those who complete this course will not only possess a thorough knowledge base, but also will be able to make informed, systematic decisions in selecting between continuous or batch methods for a particular situation or project.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This course is designed for scientists and engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals research, development, and manufacturing. The course will be of particular benefit to chemists and chemical engineers who are or are considering implementing continuous flow synthesis into their programs. Those who should attend include:
•    Chemists (Discovery/Medicinal and Process Development) and Chemical Engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals research and development
•    Chemists and Chemical Engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals manufacturing
•    Managers responsible for pharmaceutical fine chemicals research, development, and manufacturing

ABOUT THE LECTURERS
Timothy F. Jamison is a Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Klavs F. Jensen is Warren K. Lewis Professor and Head of the Chemical Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MIT Professional Education Short Programs is offering almost 50 short courses this summer for scientists, engineers, and technical professionals.

MIT PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SHORT PROGRAMS is offering almost 50 short courses this summer for scientists, engineers, and technical professionals.

Additional Biopharma courses are offered on Continuous Manufacturing, Biotherapeutics Formulation, Controlled Release, Downstream Processing, Fermentation, Flow Chemistry, Nanomaterials, Crystallization, and more.

Other course topics include: Astrophysics, Computing, Data Modeling & Analysis, Energy / Transportation, High-Speed Imaging, Innovation, Leadership, Lean Enterprise, Mechanical Design & Engineering, Nanotechnology, Supply Chain, Systems Engineering, Technology / Organizations, and more.

Learn more about these programs at: http://shortprograms.mit.edu/

Title: Flow Chemistry: Continuous Synthesis and Purification of Pharmaceuticals

Date: June 8-10, 2011

Location: MIT Campus – Cambridge, MA

URL: http://web.mit.edu/professional/short-programs/courses/flow_chemistry.html

COURSE SUMMARY

For approximately two centuries, organic synthesis has generally been conducted in a batch mode (flasks, vessels). Currently, in contrast to nearly all other major manufacturing industries, pharmaceutical companies utilize batch approaches for synthesis, with few exceptions. As economic and environmental pressures have increased, so has interest in continuous processes and continuous manufacturing. Chemistry in flow provides exquisite control over reaction conditions, incorporates continuous separations and in-line recycling of reagents, and because reactor volumes are small compared to batch, significantly enhances safety. Scale-up to large production is achieved not with stepwise transitions to larger and larger vessels, but by knowledge based selection of the appropriate size, running multiple systems in parallel, and adjusting the time a system is in operation. Moreover, a much broader range of reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, and reaction time) and many classes of reactions that are impossible, hazardous, low-throughput, or capricious in batch are safely and conveniently achieved in flow.

This course will focus on the fundamental principles and technologies used in the continuous synthesis and purification of small molecules. The advantages and challenges of flow or continuous manufacturing in comparison to batch for the production of small molecules will be discussed extensively. Advanced topics will include automation, scale-up strategies, cutting-edge methods of synthesis, and purification. Those who complete this course will not only possess a thorough knowledge base, but also will be able to make informed, systematic decisions in selecting between continuous or batch methods for a particular situation or project.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

This course is designed for scientists and engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals research, development, and manufacturing. The course will be of particular benefit to chemists and chemical engineers who are or are considering implementing continuous flow synthesis into their programs. Those who should attend include:

Chemists (Discovery/Medicinal and Process Development) and Chemical Engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals research and development

Chemists and Chemical Engineers in pharmaceutical and fine chemicals manufacturing

Managers responsible for pharmaceutical fine chemicals research, development, and manufacturing

ABOUT THE LECTURERS

Timothy F. Jamison is a Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Klavs F. Jensen is Warren K. Lewis Professor and Head of the Chemical Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

MIT Professional Education Short Programs is offering almost 50 short courses this summer for scientists, engineers, and technical professionals.

MIT PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SHORT PROGRAMS is offering almost 50 short courses this summer for scientists, engineers, and technical professionals.

Additional Biopharma courses are offered on Continuous Manufacturing, Biotherapeutics Formulation, Controlled Release, Downstream Processing, Fermentation, Flow Chemistry, Nanomaterials, Crystallization, and more.

Other course topics include: Astrophysics, Computing, Data Modeling & Analysis, Energy / Transportation, High-Speed Imaging, Innovation, Leadership, Lean Enterprise, Mechanical Design & Engineering, Nanotechnology, Supply Chain, Systems Engineering, Technology / Organizations, and more.

Learn more about these programs at: http://shortprograms.mit.edu/

Details

Start:
June 8, 2011
End:
June 10, 2011
Event Categories:
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Venue

MIT
Cambridge, MA United States + Google Map